EDxEDNYC CONFERENCE SESSIONS

Click on the subtopic or session below to see 2019 sessions.

ALL SESSIONS IN

SESSION 1 (9:30-11:00am)

Due to Travel Delays, the Zaretta Hammond Keynote has Changed.

9am: Opening Recorded Message

3pm: Closing Live Keynote by

Ms. Hammond

CONFERENCE LIVESTREAM

Scott Fowler

+ Sue Foote

SESSION OVERVIEW

Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School will be discussing and displaying their cross-curricular project that culminated in a transportable 32-foot interactive art installation based on the African American Illustrators. After students asked why all of the artists they studied in school were white, the project unfolded. The result was the unfolding of an amazing story of how the Civil Rights movement came to be, and started with the birth of the Black Press in 1827 with the publication of the first African American newspaper that was published literally steps from the Chelsea CTEHS school.


HOST BIO

Scott Fowler is an art teacher at Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School.

Sue Foote is an English teacher at Chelsea Career and Technical Education High School. 

LOCATION:

AUDITORIUM

Illustrating Black: Student Project Celebrating

The African American Illustrator

Barnaby Spring, 

Una-Kariim A. Cross,

Rahesha Amon-Harrison,

David Forbes

LOCATION:

ROOM 101

SPECIAL DOUBLE SESSION: What is Going on Here?Mindfulness in education/NYCDOE: Hope, Fears and Guides for Mindfulness as it Continues To Emerge in Public Education

SESSION OVERVIEW

Mindfulness can be an ally in the translation of our private struggles into public acceptance and action that serves everyone - particularly our students - in a society aspiring to democratic values. C. Wright Mills argued 50 years ago: one important measure of the demise of vibrant democracy and a corresponding impoverishment of political life can be found in the increasing inability of a society to translate private troubles to public issues. (Giroux). Mindfulness is emerging as a potential ally to human awareness and identification with the struggles of others that speak directly to ideas of empowerment, education, equity and excellence. Mindfulness asks, “What is really going on here?” Join the NYC Dept of Education's Director of Mindfulness in Education, along with his co-presenters, for a special multi-session course. 

NOTE: This session will “interactive” and is also primarily for educators currently practicing/teaching mindfulness/yoga strategies with/to youth.  All are welcome, but we are looking to engage folks more engaged in the work. 

HOST BIO

Barnaby Spring was born in Arizona, lost in Oak Creek Canyon for almost a full day when he was 4 years old, a graduate and former Mayor of Father Flanagan's Boys Town, graduate of Cornell University's College Scholar Honors Program (exit thesis was on the Relation of Technique in the Experimental Sciences and Creative Arts) an actor currently appearing in the recent film The Rainbow Experiment by independent film-maker Christina Kallas, currently developing a multi-media project called "Doctor Chango Partlow's Traveling Medicine Show" and is tremendously honored to be the first Director of Mindfulness in Education in the history of the NYCDOE. He is also happily married to NYCDOE long-time educator, Rachel Masters, and the proud father of Edward R. Murrow student, Eli.

Una-Kariim A. Cross is an education facilitative leadership coach, education visionary, and storyteller who is is deeply committed capacity building in youth and educators in a way that encourages thriving. Her approach to leadership development has always centered inspiration, creative wellness, and mindful pedagogical practices that facilitate critical thinking, collaboration, and self-reflection. She is an instructional leader with a sharp focus on developing student-centered teacher practice and youth development that utilizes authentic relationship building as a way to develop relevant, robust, and rigorous curriculum. Una-Kariim has over 15 years of education experience. She launched her work at Washington, D.C. based non-profit that was focused on youth development and capacity building. This opportunity allowed her to work closely with and train local youth for future opportunities. She also traveled to South Africa with a group of education and community leaders as a part of a Salzburg Education Fellowship. Shortly after, she began her work with the New York City Department of Education teaching English and Art Criticism in Bedford-Stuyvesant High Schools. During her time as High School educator she collaboratively launched and expanded the art-criticism program which partnered with the Whitney Museum of Art and The Brooklyn Museum, she also co-developed and launched a school-wide symposium and school-wide learning trips, and she hosted multiple public learning presentations whereby students presented and discussed their research to large audiences as a part of their Performance Based Assessment Task. Una-Kariim left the classroom with the purpose of expanding her work by leading adult educators as a facilitative coach. Her work as both an instructional leader and classroom educator demonstrate her devotion to cultivating the individual and community voice as well as fostering leadership development. Una-Kariim is currently working to secure her administrative licensure. She holds a Master’s Degree in Education from Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus. She holds an Master of Fine Arts Degree from the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning, and a Bachelor Degree in Electronic Media. Una-Kariim is a published photographer and writer and has written for Ebony.com, The Root.com and more. She was a Teacher Exchange Educational Fellow with the Whitney Museum of Art, and an Artist in Residence at The Wexner Center. She currently serves as an Education Advisor for the 14+ Foundation.

 

Rahesha Amon-Harrison is an educator at heart who has emerged an intrepid 21st Century educational leader. After 26 years as an award winning classroom teacher, she stepped into the roles of Educational Coach, Academic Director, and Assistant Principal, prior to becoming a founding Principal of Frederick Douglass Academy III in Bronx, New York. She later became a Deputy Superintendent and currently serves as the Superintendent of Community School District 16 in Brooklyn, New York where she is spearheading the district’s Vision 2021 Initiative; cultivating leadership at all levels for the purpose of increasing student achievement and access to opportunities. Since her tenure, Amon-Harrison was recognized by Brooklyn Deep as one of the New Generation of Leaders in education to watch. She recently received the 2019 Black History Trailblazer Award from Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. Amon-Harrison holds a Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership from Fordham University and a Bachelors of Arts Degree from North Carolina Central University. In 2018 NCCU awarded her the coveted “Distinguished Alumni” award. She participated in the Harvard University Principal’s Institute, Teachers College, Columbia University’s Cahn Fellowship program and participated in the prestigious Center for Creative Leadership’s Managing Highly Effective Teams program. Mrs. Amon-Harrison believes that all children, regardless of their “zip code”, deserve an education that is progressive, rigorous, and culturally responsive while supporting the social emotional wellness of children.

David Forbes, PhD (Berkeley), LMHC, taught School Counseling at Brooklyn College for nineteen years and is Associate Emeritus Professor in the Urban Education Doctoral Program at the CUNY Graduate Center. He wrote Boyz 2 Buddhas: Counseling Urban High School Male Athletes in the Zone (2004) about his experience teaching integral mindfulness to a Brooklyn high school football team. He was  a co-recipient of a Contemplative Program Development Fellowship from the Center for Contemplative Mind in Society and was Member of the Month of the Mindfulness and Contemplative Education Network (March 2017). He is a member of the Mindfulness and Social Change Network based in the UK and is featured on a UK website, "Being Mindful of our World: A Collection of Social Mindfulness Voices." He teaches, consults with, writes on, and encourages mindfulness educators to question the neoliberal, individualist context of schooling and to pivot to a transformative, critical social mindfulness practice. Online articles, some co-authored, include "Occupy Mindfulness," "Search Outside Yourself: Google Misses a Lesson in Wisdom 101,"  “Mindfulness and Neoliberal Education: Accommodation or Transformation?", "How to be Mindful of McMindfulness," and "Critical Integral Contemplative Education," and co-edited Handbook of Mindfulness: Culture, Context, and Social Engagement (Springer 2016). His book, Mindfulness and its Discontents: Education, Self, and Social Transformation, came out spring 2019. 

 


ON THE WEB

@BarnabySpring

@suptamond16bk   

@unakariim

Room

TBD

Room

TBD

SESSION OVERVIEW

This conversation will explore how we can become more intentional about growing the capacity and reach of our non-teaching staff members. Staff members outside the classroom are essential to the success and social-emotional growth of our students. How can we best utilize, grow and support these important educators? Come learn about the ways that Hudson High School of Learning Technologies has developed the role of non-teaching staff members to support our students, reduce suspensions, build community and increase emotional well-being of our learners.


HOST BIO

Will Hart is the parent coordinator and heads up the Dean's Office at Hudson High School of Learning Technologies in New York City. 

Will Hart

LOCATION:

ROOM 104

The Forgotten Educators: How to Grow the Role

of Non-Teaching Staff Members

Virtual Reality, Real Learning

SESSION OVERVIEW

Developing and using virtual reality applications can be used as a lure to develop students curiosity towards initially uninteresting topics. A brief presentation on my experience developing VR modeling for student learning, then participants would work in groups to design a mental mock up of a possible VR applications (for assigned topics) with a focus on how they would be designed, and try out other peoples paper mockups for feedback.


HOST BIO

Katie Gatto is a Specialist Professor of Computer Science and Software Engineering at Monmouth University. Her research focuses primarily on pedagogical applications of technology.

Katie Gatto

LOCATION:

ROOM 106

Dr. Denver J. Fowler

LOCATION:

ROOM 110

Leading for Equity, Equality, Social Justice, Inclusion, and Multiculturalism in Schools

SESSION OVERVIEW

In this session, terminology, strategies and techniques for leading for inclusiveness in schools will be shared. More specifically, the presenter will introduce and define several terms as it applies to leading for inclusiveness in schools. In addition, the presenter will share multiple techniques, strategies and resources with regards to leading for equity, equality, social justice, inclusion, and multiculturalism in schools.


HOST BIO

 

Dr. Denver J. Fowler currently serves as Chair of the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) program and Professor of PK-12 Educational Leadership at Franklin University (FU). Prior to his appointment at FU, Dr. Fowler served as a Program Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies at California State University, Sacramento (CSUS), where he also served as an elected Senator on Faculty Senate. Prior to his appointment at CSUS, Dr. Fowler served as an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership at The University of Mississippi, where he also served as the elected President of the Mississippi Association of Professors of Educational Leadership. Prior to his full-time experience in higher education, Dr. Fowler held adjunct appointments at The Ohio State University-Newark, The University of West Florida, and Bowling Green State University. In the higher education setting, he has successfully taught courses in a variety of formats (including face-to-face, online, & hybrid) within Ph.D., Ed.D., M.A., M.Ed., Ed.S., and B.S. programs, as well as superintendent, principal, and teacher licensure programs. Additionally, Dr. Fowler has helped numerous Doctoral and Master's students complete the dissertation and thesis/project process, having served on several dissertation/thesis/project committees. In addition to his experience in higher education, Dr. Fowler has over a decade of successful experience in the PreK-12 educational setting, where he served as a coach, teacher, athletic director, technology coordinator, and school administrator. During this tenure, he was named the Ohio Association of Secondary School Administrators and National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) State Assistant Principal of the Year in Ohio, and nominated for the NASSP National Assistant Principal of the Year in the United States. A strong supporter of education and policy reform, Dr. Fowler has spoken on Capitol Hill in order to advocate for educators and school leaders nationwide. He has written extensively on the topic of educational leadership, and has presented his research around the globe including presentations in China, Turkey, Puerto Rico, Africa, Italy, and Greece. He is an active member of several organizations including the American Educational Research Association (AERA), International Council of Professors of Educational Leadership (ICPEL), World Education Research Association (WERA), American Association of School Administrators (AASA), Association for Middle Level Education (AMLE), and Educational Leaders Without Borders (ELWB), to name a few. Dr. Fowler earned his Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Administration at Ohio University, Master of Arts (M.A.) in Education at Mount Vernon Nazarene University, and Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Education at The Ohio State University. In addition to his degrees, Dr. Fowler is currently completing the Certificate of Advanced Educational Leadership at Harvard University, has completed a School Leadership Institute at Harvard University, and is a licensed Superintendent, Principal, and Teacher. 

 


ON TWITTER

@DenverJFowler

Teaching with Passion!

SESSION OVERVIEW

Let's talk about how we bring our passions to our pedagogy in order to engage our students with the materials we love. How can we get students to love the things we love? This conversation will center around using what you love to maximize student engagement into your curriculum. Teachers will brainstorm activities they can integrate into their units that utilize their passions in order to engage students.


HOST BIO

Mike Ponella is an educator with 10 years experience as both a Special Educator and English Educator. He works at Hudson High School of Learning Technologies. 

Mike Ponella

LOCATION:

ROOM 112

Dr. Kia Turner

and Lisa Benson

Conversations in the Group Chat: What Parents Want

Teachers to Know About Creating an Inclusive Classroom

SESSION OVERVIEW

In this session participants will learn how to create inclusive classrooms spaces where students with disabilities are seen and can thrive. Participants will have a round table discussion complete with call to action. Over the course of the workshop they will examine their personal bias, dissect the impact on culture/climate for unseen populations, learn how to combat bias, and walk away with a plan for empowering all students to be 21st century learners.


HOST BIO

Dr. Kia Turner is a teacher, professor, author, and advocate from Kansas City, MO. She spent more than a decade in the classroom working with high needs communities, and now is professor of urban education at Park University. She uses her experiences with children and families at risk to better prepare teachers to go into those same classrooms.

 

Lisa Benson is a substitute teacher, parent, and diversity advocate with more than 20 years of experience in community engagement. After a personal experience with workplace bias, she went on to earn her certificate in Diversity and Inclusion from Cornell University and uses that knowledge to better advocate for herself, her children, and other marginalized groups.

LOCATION:

ROOM 131

Walter Brown + Dr. Kate Spence + Roberto Cabrera

LOCATION:

ROOM 133

Adjusting School Systems by Walking the Talk: Leadership and Reflective Dialogue with All Stakeholders

SESSION OVERVIEW

In urban public schools committed to providing quality education to all students, school leaders and professional learning opportunities play a key role in advancing this goal. Principals, assistant principals, and school coaches support the development and implementation of social-justice oriented practices. This collaborative, interactive workshop will explore leadership and coaching practices that have contributed to the creation of a place where these practices could flourish. The need for urban schools that provide equitable, high-quality learning opportunities for all students, particularly those who have been historically underserved is unquestionable. However, creating or developing schools that are able to do so has proven to be a challenge, even in places with well-intentioned teachers or school leaders. At Hudson High School of Learning Technologies, a small, public, unscreened New York City high school, several social-justice oriented practices have been developed and implemented, including the Student Success Center (a restorative justice approach to replace the Dean’s Office), Right to Read (a literacy acceleration program for all) and advisory (a mixed-grade group of students and teacher functioning as a school “family”). In this interactive session, we will consider the question of the role of school leadership and professional learning in supporting the development of a place where these approaches could flourish. A school leader and coach will propose several components that may have been foundational in supporting the development and implementation of these and other social-justice oriented practices at the school, seeking input from participants about areas of resonance, dissonance, and successes and challenges in leadership or professional learning at other school sites.


HOST BIO

Walter, father of four boys, has been in public education for 22 years as a classroom teacher and currently serves as an Assistant Principal at Hudson High School of Learning Technologies as well as co-founder of the annual #EdxEdNYC Learning Conference. He has been invited to speak at the Tech Forum NY "Fostering Innovation at the School and District Level” 2015 ; BREC “How to Implement an Effective Team Approach to Teaching” 2009; Adelphi University “Urban Education Conference” 2007. He currently sits on the board of the nonprofit “InnovatingEd” and is commission of Levittown North Baseball @wbrownhhs

 

Kate has been a coach with ISA since 2006. She previously taught English at both the middle and high school levels. She has also served as a literacy coach and is an associate professor of education. Kate specializes in curriculum development, professional development, school change, urban education, teacher preparation and induction, literacy, and inquiry-based instruction. As a coach, she enjoys success in collaborating with teachers to develop and implement curricula that leads to students higher order thinking.

ONLINE

@wbrownhhs

@k8ad0

Robert Hemstreet

Bringing Coding into any Classroom with Codesters

SESSION OVERVIEW

Coding is an important 21st century skill and can be a great gateway and support to topics in math and science. Codesters is a platform that instructs students in coding and provides projects that align with standards based math and science curriculum. Students learn-to-code so they can code-to-learn. The idea that coding is an important 21st century skill has been widely accepted. We work to put coding in our classrooms and allow students to engage and create with computers. In addition to teaching coding skills themselves, coding can be a gateway and support for topics in other subjects, like math and science. In this conversation, we’ll start with some skills and instruction you’ll need to start coding in the Codesters platform. Then, we’ll provide examples of projects that allow students to investigate math and science concepts within the coding environment. We will also practice techniques to encourage collaboration through structured conversations and offer strategies for formal and informal peer review and revision during these projects. We’ll discuss how these strategies can help to engage all students and drive student learning.


HOST BIO

Mr. Hemstreet has always been a teacher at heart, but started his professional life working in the technology industry. When he decided to become a teacher at a school, he joined the NYC Teaching Fellows and attended St. John's University, receiving his Masters Degree in Education, with certifications in Math and Special Education. For the past nine years, he has been teaching math at MS 337 in the Bronx. For the past six years, Mr Hemstreet has also been bringing his interest in technology and computers into the classroom and leading 6th, 7th, and 8th grade technology classes.

ONLINE

@robhemstreet 

LOCATION:

ROOM 134

Project Based Learning for Social Change

SESSION OVERVIEW

Bringing authentic, project-based learning into the classroom can help students explore issues within their own communities while also increasing engagement and ownership of learning. In this session we will look at a real project carried out by 12th graders this year. We will explore the importance of small group mentoring classes, how to leverage technology for authentic research, and imagine what our own project based classrooms can look like in the future.


HOST BIO

Adam Markowitz is an English teacher currently in his 8th year of teaching. He is passionate about project-based learning, and can't wait to discuss with you!

Adam Markowitz

LOCATION:

ROOM 136

Curtis Smith

Bernard Addo

Thomas Mcbryde, Jr.

LOCATION:

ROOM 140

Culturally Responsive Mindfulness in Schools of Color

SESSION OVERVIEW

Culturally responsive mindfulness has promoted progressive success within our district-wide scholar, parental, and leadership communities and we’d like to share how. Mindfulness has been at the forefront of our successful mentorship and rites of passage program. Our conversation includes interactive discussions that give attendees the opportunity to investigate culturally responsive mindfulness and how we’ve implemented the practice at a class, school and district level. In 90 minutes we’ll dive into three school community levels of Mindfulness; mindfulness in the classroom, schoolwide, and district level. Get first-hand accounts from a scholar, educator, principal, and a district superintendent about how mindfulness has elevated community District 19 despite their high needs demographic in Brooklyn. The impact of mindfulness will be evaluated from all perspectives and participants will learn about the current science-based evidence to connect research to the success our communities have experienced while taking away the best practices for paying it forward. We’ll share success stories of how mindfulness has worked at each level, including our mentorship and rites of passage program as we formulate action plans for practical implementation. Facilitated by educator, Mr. Curtis Smith and lead by Superintendent Dr. Mcbryde Jr., we’ll engage a guided discussion on transforming school culture using mindfulness and other social-emotional tools. After hearing the stories of key members of our community, participants will engage in guided practices, small group discussions, and active group work around the mindfulness tools that are making waves. Together we’ll explore how to use music, movement, and art to create a culturally-relevant mindfulness practice and conversation rooted in science-based results accessible to scholars, parents, educators, and leaders in the inner city. There will be an opportunity to share reflections and design your own mindfulness plan to take back and make your own.

HOST BIO

Curtis Smith is an Educator, Speaker, and creator of Moment of Mindfulness (MOM), a mindfulness methodology and company committed to empowering communities to activate their best intentions through culturally responsive yet evidence-based mindfulness tools. In 2013, Curtis co-founded Vista Academy, one of the top rated public middle schools in Brooklyn, New York. In his 10th year as an educator, he leads the mindfulness program that’s infused in the school’s mission, Character Education. The impact of the program has not only contributed to Vista’s improved learning community, but also led to his work with New York City Department of Education District 19, where he facilitates and designs workshops for Barack Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Alliance. Curtis is one of the highest rated educators in Brooklyn and holds a bachelor’s in Political Science from the University of Michigan, a master’s degree from Brooklyn College in the Science of Education, a certification in Mindfulness and Loving Kindness from The Path in partnership with The Nalanda Institute, and is a recent RISE for Educators recipient from Kripalu’s Center for Yoga and Health.

 

Bernard Addo is the principal of Vista Academy Middle School, located in East New York, Brooklyn. His 20 years experience in education comprises of 4 years as teacher, 1 year as Dean and 15 years as administrator. Bernard’s passion lies in guiding middle schoolers to navigate the stresses and challenges of transitioning from dependent elementary school scholars to becoming independent high schoolers. He is a staunch believer in educating the whole scholar via use of rigorous Academic Instruction coupled with strategic Social Emotional supports. Dr.

 

Thomas Mcbryde Jr. is an instructional leader committed to creating collaborative communities that foster a shared vision of purposeful instruction, accountability, and responsibility of transforming students into life-long learners and prepared citizens. Dr. McBryde graduated from Morehouse College, where he received his B.A. in English. After graduation, he began his teaching career as an 8th grade English Language Arts instructor in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Mcbryde completed his Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and joined New Leaders for New Schools in the NYCDOE as a Resident Principal at Esperanza Preparatory Academy in Community District 4. After Esperanza, he became the Principal of Mott Hall IV Middle School in Community District 23 where he increased student achievement steadily. After a 5-year tenure, he became the Deputy Superintendent of Community District 4 before becoming the current Community Superintendent of District 19. His District wide initiatives: Comprehensive Literacy, Equity and Access, early childhood development, and social emotional support through mentoring (My Brothers Keeper and Girls Empowerment Movement) drive the movement of the district “All the Way Up!”.

ONLINE

@mrcurtissmith

@McbrydeDr

@baddo

Lori
Stahl-Van Brackle, Ann Sacks, 

Liliana Villegas + Lou Lahana

Maker Ed = Creative Ed

SESSION OVERVIEW

Bringing Maker Ed projects into subject classes can help build engagement, autonomy, and ownership in learning. We will explore how technology can help you bridge the demands for content mastery and creative self-expression through various projects such as 3D printing, film making, cardboard builds, and Web and Game Design. We’ll also look at ways to assess projects on the design principles and ISTE Standards.


HOST BIO

Serving the public schools of Manhattan as Instruction Technology Director has allowed me to focus on incorporating creative use of technology in the classroom. Centering on the Maker Movement, I have developed a cohort of educators that share their passion for Making. Before this position I served as a middle school technology educator, curriculum developer and award-winning teacher. Making Makers is what I strive for, whether those makers are students or educators, I am passionate about sharing the joys of learning through making and using computers as creative tools. I was part of the Software Engineering Pilot Program's first Cohort, a CS4All fellow working on designing the curriculum for the CS4All Blueprint in New York City. Recently the Manhattan Make-a-thon made it possible for educators to showcase for each other how they approach project-based learning, which they have honed in the MNBO Maker Ed Cohort. Documenting through online forums, like the Ed x Ed Blog and the MNBO Maker Ed Web site has allowed me to practice my other passion of writing and sharing ideas with a broader audience.

Amy Sacks: Creativity truly is the journey and the destination in Amy’s PS15 program. She has launched CS4All programs, including coding, robotics, and 3D design. Students create digital art and animations, and a number of projects have been selected for the Borough Arts Festivals each year. Amy has partnered with Manhattan Borough Office, D1, and CS4All to support STEAM. She hosted three anual District Make/Hack-A-Thons, involving families throughout District 1. She has co-authored and secured many grants to create and upkeep a Maker Space that had expanded PS15’s STEAM learning opportunities. Amy also become a CS4All NYC lead to help train teachers in District 1 and PS15.

ONLINE

@loristava

LOCATION:

B12

Promoting Conversation in the ESL Classroom

SESSION OVERVIEW

Exploring different ways to get our beginner and intermediate English language learners engaged in meaningful conversations in class. Everyone will have a chance to provide their ideas on how to get their students talking in class. I will then facilitate the conversation around the impact of creating a culture of conversation in class. Finally, we will see how we can turn regular activities into games that can serve to promote conversations in class.


HOST BIO

Franklin Santana, ELL Coordinator at Hudson. MA in TESOL & Bilingual, & Linguistic Education. 16 years of teaching experience in NYC.

Franklin Santana

LOCATION:

B16

Phil Linder

+ Tim Comer

Designing Classrooms that Teach Humans:

From Theory to Practice

SESSION OVERVIEW

Human systems are not not teaching strategies or assessments, but in this conversation we will discuss what they may look like in practice. Human systems are not teaching strategies or assessments, it is a change in attitude. Designing classrooms that teach humans acknowledges that people do not come in standard sizes, shapes, colors or genders. Recognizing this truth is the first step in designing schools that allow good people of honest intent to do great work. In this session, teachers will be encouraged to share their work and identify in what ways we can changes schools for the better.

HOST BIO

Phil is in his 9th year as a teacher and began working at Hudson High School of Learning Technologies in 2013. He is a cofounder of EDxEDNYC. Phil is the husband of a beautiful wife and has an indisputably handsome dog. 

Tim is a ntural science teacher who is committed to inquiry teaching, task-based assessment, and educational technology integration. As a teacher leader and leadership scholar, Tim is passionate about promoting continuous school improvements through data analysis and systems design. Tim is also a husband, a father and a competitive martial artist. He is also a cofounder of EDxEDNYC. 

ONLINE

@cambrianed       @thehistorydude

LOCATION:

B19

Samantha Black

Rethinking Lesson Design for Today's Social Studies

SESSION OVERVIEW

A shift in mindset for lesson planning and implementation are needed to respond to the instructional and assessment expectations of the Social Studies Framework and new GHGII and US Regents. Using a design thinking process we can consider the "user" from a position of empathy when designing learning opportunities to cognitively engage our students.


HOST BIO

Samantha is a district administrator for Social Studies in Farmingdale, NY. Working with teachers and administrators from kindergarten through grade 12, she works actively to support curriculum design and experiential learning for students to develop the skills and practices of the Social Studies relative to content in a developmentally appropriate ways. As a secondary school Social Studies teacher for many years, Samantha recognizes the challenges related to preparing our students for college, career, and civic readiness. As a building and district administrator, she leads professional learning for teachers. Samantha is works actively engaging in responsive leadership and teaching and ensuring that students' needs drive our practice.

LOCATION:

B21

Jennifer S. Brown

LOCATION:

B29

Carving the Path: An Innovative Conversation and Creation of a Vision

SESSION OVERVIEW

Participants will redefine their vision, dig deeper into their beliefs, and make them come to fruition in their everyday decision-making. Addressing equity and excellence requires intention. So, when educators define their vision and use that as a spring board for their everyday decisions, it exponentially increases their power and impact. Having a vision brings to light the contribution of how their choices for themselves and their students works toward what educators ultimately want to accomplish in their classrooms. This conversation results in a specific, organically created guide for self-reflection and change.
 

HOST BIO

Jennifer Brown is a first-grade teacher at Sheridan Elementary in Junction City, Kansas. Brown holds a bachelor’s degree in Theatre and Psychology from the University of Mount Union, a Masters of Education from John Carroll University, and is currently working on her Ph.D in Curriculum and Instruction from Kansas State University. She has taught kindergarten, first grade, second grade, and served as a library media specialist. She also spent two years as a Graduate Teaching Assistant at Kansas State University teaching Intermediate Literacy Methods before beginning her journey as a middle school teacher. Brown’s research interests include composition pedagogy, the history of writing instruction, and teaching for social justice. She has presented at regional and national conferences in addition to many district professional developments. She serves as a graduate student ambassador for Kansas State University and received the College of Education’s award for Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant in 2017. She was named to the Kansas Teacher of the Year Team in 2019. As a teacher, she thrives on the daily challenge to engage students as active and collaborative participants in their education. Her vision is to cultivate environments of positivity, change, and equity. Her mission is to communicate the value of others so clearly that they are inspired to see it in themselves. She believes there is no greater responsibility than to educate and care for each and every student, preparing them not only for the next academic step, but for life.

ONLINE

@jsgb03

Vivett Dukes + Whitney Hollins

LOCATION:

B35b

Hidden Among Us: Identifying and Supporting
Children With Incarcerated Parents

SESSION OVERVIEW

2.7 million kids in the US have an incarcerated parent. As educators, we need to learn how to best support this "invisible" population. Many educators are unaware that they have students with an incarcerated parent in their classroom. When we as educators become more knowledgable in area of mass incarceration and it's collateral damage, we become better pedagogues. Two educators who have direct experience with familial incarceration, will lead a discussion which provides insight into how mass incarceration intersects and affects with the classroom and how we can best service all our students.

 

HOST BIO

Vivett Dukes (nèe Hemans) is in her eighth year as a middle and high school English Language Arts teacher. For her first four years in the DOE, she taught in an all-male, all minority, urban public school in Southside Jamaica, Queens erected for the express purpose of counteracting the pervasive school-to-prison pipeline that disproportionately impacts Black and Brown boys. Currently, she is teaching in a College Board middle and high school also in Jamaica, Queens where the population of students she serves is diversified on cultural, religious, and socio-economic planes. During her time as a teacher within the New York City Department of Education she has served as a member of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation's Teacher Advisory Council 2014-2016 cohort, a classroom lab facilitator with Chancellor Carmen Fariña's Learning Partners Program, grade team leader, inquiry team leader, English Department Chairperson and Bethune Teaching Fellow for the New York Urban League. Currently, in additional to teaching seventh-grade English Language Arts, she serves as a Lead Middle School Quality Initiative (MSQI) Reading Across All Disciplines (RAAD) Literacy Teacher, Advisor for the New York Times' Upfront magazine and Scholastic Inc., educational blogger for New York School Talk, and Co-CEO/Co-Founder of SpeakYaTruth.org and One Voice Online Blog Magazine. She also hosts a bi-weekly #SafeSpaceConvos Twitter chat about issues as the forefront of education. ​

 

Whitney Hollins, Ph.D., is a special education teacher. She has experience working with students who have been classified as learning disabled, intellectually disabled, emotionally/behaviorally disabled and speech/language impaired. Hollins is also an adjunct instructor in the special education department at Hunter College, where she instructs graduate-level students. She has a doctorate in the Urban Education program from the CUNY Graduate Center.

Stephanie Arnell

LOCATION:

200

Dive in Deeper: Using TEACHROCK
to Scaffold Lessons for ELL Students

SESSION OVERVIEW

TeachRock is a standards-aligned, arts integration curriculum that uses the history of popular music and culture to help teachers engage students. The TeachRock curriculum integrates disciplines across the board and provides the perfect opportunity to build on prior knowledge to establish a link between students and new content material. Through the use of historical footage, think-pair-share activities and group collaboration, students’ experience personal connections that motivate them to think critically and relate material to historical events and current times. TeachRock lessons present structured opportunities for role-play and visuals that provide academic vocabulary to be introduced and reinforced with ELL students. Educators will dive into TeachRock lessons such as “Rock and Roll and the American Dream”, “Muddy Waters: The New Kid in Town”, and “The Leadership Roles of a Music Producer“ to discuss strategies that ensure all ELL students are engaged in their own learning. Conversations will center around whether the “American Dream” is simply a quest for a better life along with how and why the dream has changed over time. We will also discuss the emotions that arise when students feel like the “new kid” somewhere and how such experiences may provide opportunities for reflection and personal narratives. Educators will learn strategies such as VTS (Visual Thinking Strategies) to facilitate student understanding and conversation while embodying their road to success based on personal experience.


HOST BIO

Stephanie Arnell is a seventeen-year veteran music educator who teaches at the Atkinson School in Freeport N.Y. A 1999 graduate of the Crane School of Music-SUNY Potsdam, Stephanie holds a BA in Music and Special Education. Stephanie earned a Master’s degree in Music Therapy from the University of Kansas and also has a TESOL advanced certificate from St. John’s University. Stephanie has presented at the NYSSMA Winter Conference, The Balanced Mind Conference, and for NMEA (Nassau Music Educators Association) and has written lessons for TeachRock. Stephanie was honored when she was chosen as 2017 Freeport Teacher of the Year. Stephanie’s classroom learning environment promotes fun, growth, and success through meaningful relationships.

Frances Amato

LOCATION:

201

Innovative Educational Technology

Tools for the Classroom

SESSION OVERVIEW

When we want students to learn, we need to drive right in! Engagement is an essential element of the learning process. Educational technology offers innovative tools that are free and low cost to educators. Using these learning tools empowers our teachers to access and/or create innovative lessons. The main idea of the conversation will contain links to research, discussion on innovations in the classroom as well as ideas and topics on how a teacher could use tools such as educational technology to promote STEM education into your school. By utilizing learning tools such as Google Expeditions, teachers can gain access to content free content on a variety of subject matters. These lessons can inspire students to learn, take a virtual field trip and support disadvantaged students. Many students in NYC have never been scuba diving, let alone traveling through the ocean zones but with my lessons they can explore as if they were there. This session will provide information on free and low cost tools that can provide access to innovative educational lessons. The discussion will also go into how, why and when it will be implemented as well as funding opportunities available to educators.


HOST BIO

Frances Amato is a STEM Teacher and Technology Liaison at P. S. 37R. This is a District 75 school that is located on Staten Island, New York. She works with students with cognitive delays in an alternate assessment program setting. Frances created a successful STEM program within her school seven years ago. In this program, she teaches her students coding, circuits, programming robots, digital literacy and more. Frances has been an educator for sixteen years and is a Doctoral Candidate that will shortly be conferring her Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Technology and Design. Her dissertation is on the technology acceptance of primary educators who use one to one technology to teach.

ONLINE

@TechSavvy_Teach

Christina Roberts

+ Athena Fliakos

Body Talks: Culturally Responsive Teaching
Using the Common Language of the Body

SESSION OVERVIEW

Our investigation begins with the beating of the heart, notices the shape of the breath, and ends in a clarification of not just culturally responsive teaching, but totally responsive teaching. Come discuss the most obvious and often overlooked common language, the language of the body!

HOST BIO

Christina is an English teacher turned three-time former Principal who has served high needs and underserved students in East New York, Canarsie, The Bronx, and most recently, in the Capital Region of New York. She is passionate and persistent in developing instructional models that connect every part of the human to her/his deepest wisdom by connecting and applying learning through the improved body awareness, greater mindfulness, and unfettered confidence to achieve high personal standards through service to others.

 

Athena is an English Teacher turned three-time Teacher Talent Developer and Instructional coach committed to re-imagining the business of teaching and learning by building totally responsive environments that celebrate and empower students and teachers to become their own champions through a series of frameworks built on the connection between mind, body, spirit, and service to others.

ONLINE

@thegoodbrain

LOCATION:

232

Jennifer Lewis

LOCATION:

303

Developing a Leadership Toolbox: Utilizing Protocols to Promote Collaboration, Advanced Literacy, and Equity

SESSION OVERVIEW

Developing a leadership toolbox, participants will learn how to utilize protocols to promote collaboration, advanced literacy, and equity. Protocols can be utilized in classrooms, teacher teams, professional development sessions, and administrative meetings. Promoting a culture of collaboration, protocols deepen participants’ understanding, encourage reflection, promote academic rigor, foster distributive leadership, and facilitate the development of a professional learning community. This session will include: hands-on training in multiple protocols, testimonials from students, teacher leaders, school leaders, and district leaders, and group discussion about education policy and research. Aligned with the NYCDOE Instructional Leadership Framework and the NYSED guidelines for Advanced Literacy and Culturally Responsive-Sustaining Education, participants will learn how protocols can be incorporated into curriculum, instruction, and collaborative efforts.

HOST BIO

Ms. Lewis is an aspiring school and district leader who currently serves as a high school English Teacher, Teacher Leader, and Teacher Leadership Facilitator. A strong instructional and facilitative leader, Ms. Lewis has taught students in grades 9-12 in co-teaching, ELL/MLL, honors, and alternative classroom settings in schools in Queens and in the Bronx. Ms. Lewis’ experience reflects her career-long commitment to the priorities outlined in the Chancellor’s Expectations and the Framework for Great Schools, including accelerating learning and instruction, partnering with communities, developing people, and advancing equity now.

Ms. Lewis’ extensive leadership experience includes developing and facilitating professional development, developing and implementing curricula, and promoting increased teacher collaboration and inquiry through teacher teams for a faculty of over 200 teachers. Ms. Lewis was recognized as a teacher leader who has the capacity to become a school leader at a recent Office of Leadership dinner. Selected as one of 40 Teacher Leadership Facilitators for the NYCDOE Teacher Leadership Program (TLP), Ms. Lewis delivers facilitative and instructional leadership training to K-12 teacher leaders and school leaders throughout Queens to promote collaboration, student achievement, and equity and excellence for all. Ms. Lewis has been endorsed as a Facilitator by TLP and the School Reform Initiative (SRI), an independent, non-profit organization serving students, teachers, and leaders throughout the United States and beyond which aims to create transformational learning communities, committed to educational equity and excellence. A member of the Advanced Literacy Team, Ms. Lewis collaborates with school leadership to plan, organize, and streamline efforts to promote Advanced Literacy and alignment with the NYCDOE Instructional Leadership Framework and the Culturally Sustaining-Responsive Education Framework. Strengthening ties between her school and alumni communities, Ms. Lewis is the cofounder and coordinator of the Francis Lewis High School Alumni Association, a 501(c)(3) organization that has partnered with the citywide Alumni Association, PS Alumni. Ms. Lewis is a member of the Postsecondary Leadership Team through the NYCDOE College Access for All initiative. Ms. Lewis is a graduate student in the College of Saint Rose/Center for Integrated Training Education Program for Education Leadership who will graduate with SBL/SDL certification in the summer of 2019.

ONLINE

@FLHSMsLewis

Irene Yannascoli

Sarah Stahl

LOCATION:

306

The Power of Yes: How Our Planning and
Management Can Welcome All Students

SESSION OVERVIEW

Do you find yourself stuck in battles with students that seem unnecessary? Join our conversation about how creating a policy of saying “yes” to students can help create better buy in, more excitement for class activities, and better attendance. Curious to hear more? Say yes and join us! Educators make choices that often reflect their own values and identity. Saying “yes” and incorporating choice gives us the opportunity to recenter students in the conversation and to meet them within their own power. It sends the message that their values and identities matter and that the curriculum is not a rigid structure imposed on them. Rather, it’s a unique educational experience designed just for them.


HOST BIO

Irene Yannascoli teaches English and Humanities at Frank McCourt High School. A native New Yorker, she began her teaching career in prisons and jails in Washington State, and then came home to the city to try her hand at public school. After short stints in the Bronx and at a traveling international school, she found her home at FMHS. She loves the collaboration and encouragement to take risks that she receives there, and she especially loved collaborating with Sarah Stahl. Outside of work, she is a yogi and poet. She and her husband are currently restoring an old home.

 

Sarah Stahl has been an English teacher for the NYC DOE for 13 years. She is passionate about student-centered and problem based learning, a skill-set she honed during her six years at Frank McCourt High School. During this time she and Irene worked closely together to engage in responsive teaching practices. Constantly looking for a way to deepen her teaching practice and expand her teaching tool kit, Sarah embarked on a new challenge in 2018. For the past two years she has been an English teacher at English Language Learners International Support Preparatory Academy (ELLIS Prep). As a transfer school for an 100% ELL new immigrant population, ELLIS has given Sarah an opportunity to expand her student-centered responsive pedagogy to students who bring immense life experience and resiliency to their education.

Martha St. Jean

LOCATION:

ROOM 310

SESSION OVERVIEW

You are invited to work in community to develop a strategic and sustainable approach to SELF-C.A.R.E (Critically and Responsive Education). In order for educators to bring their best selves into the classroom, and ensure that neither a student’s background nor zip code determines the quality of education they receive, it’s important to recognize and acknowledge biases that exist. Implicit in this acknowledgement, is the idea and ideal of dignity within the student-teacher relationship. The goal is to use this 80-minute workshop to help those in the field of education create a strategic and sustainable plan of critical self-engagement with language that edifies and encourages, rather than stigmatizes and marginalizes. This conversation allows for an open avenue to address the negative schema that sometimes develops over the course of the school year. Engaging in critically conscious education requires reflection, and often a paradigm shift in how one perceives the classroom, community, and the educational system through which we operate in order initiate and/or continue the development of formal and lasting change.


HOST BIO

Martha is a native New Yorker and middle school Special Educator. She works to facilitate high quality, and high impact relationships in and around the school community. Her past work in media allows her to bring multiple perspectives into the classroom. She enjoys engaging with middle schoolers with a goal of cultivating intellectual curiosity, and capacity. She studied at Teachers College, Columbia University, and works to make cultural connections to curricular content, and helping access resources.

ONLINE

@MarthaStJean

Self-C.A.R.E (Critically AND Responsive Education)

Dr. Casey Cohen + 

Dr. Margery Covello

LOCATION:

314

The Interconnectedness of Technology and Equity and Excellence In Current and Emerging K-12 School Leadership Job Descriptions

SESSION OVERVIEW

Having a lasting impact on equity & excellence isn’t just buying the ‘right’ device-It's about hiring the right people to lead the charge. Are a school leader’s technology knowledge and significant school improvement directly proportional? School leaders from urban, suburban, charter and public networks discuss the connection among technology, innovation, instructional leadership, student growth and school leaders familiarity with technology as the technology director and school leadership roles evolve as technology integration increases. 

HOST BIO

Dr. Casey Cohen- After spending 12 years in the classroom as a middle and high school English teacher in the city and suburbs of Boston and Philadelphia, Dr. Casey Cohen is currently the Director of Technology Innovation & STEM Programs for the Rose Tree Media School District. She earned her BA from the University of Michigan, where she studied English, history, and theatre; her Ed.M. from Harvard University, where she studied urban education; and her principal certification from the University of Pennsylvania, where she studied school leadership. Most recently Dr. Cohen earned her Ed.D. from Lamar University, where she studied school leadership with a focus in global education. Dr. Cohen is a proud member of the Apple Distinguished Educator class of 2015. She presents on topics ranging from global collaboration, rethinking teaching and learning with iPads, contemporary literacies, and future ready teaching, leadership and learning strategies around the country.

 

Dr. Margery Covello has earned degrees from Fordham University including a BS in Finance, a MBA in Management and an Ed.D. in Executive Leadership: Administration and Supervision. She has vast experience in business and academic arenas. Currently she is the Chief of Staff at American Paradigm Schools. Prior to that she was the Director of Operations at Philadelphia Performing Arts Charter School. This experience gave her an understanding of the direct experiential learning of students who will ultimately pursue higher education. At Philadelphia Performing Arts she was part of a team of innovative educators who on a daily basis reimagined school not just as a place, but as a limitless state of mind where highly engaged students, in partnership with teachers as content experts and content creators, solved real world problems and explored issues for deeper understanding and meaning. In the business world, she co-founded Pine Street Dermatology, a family owned and operated dermatology practice in Center City. With much teamwork, planning and ingenuity grew the business from 18 patients on day one to 26,000 patients 10 years later. She held a variety of positions at Fordham University including Assistant Dean in the College of Business Administration, Director of Residential Life and the director of Fordham University’s international business program, a signature academic program that transformed the undergraduate business college and was an engine of growth for the college in enrollment, in reputation, and in ranking. Dr. Covello provided academic advising for some 300 undergraduate students, coordinated course and instructor scheduling, and taught in the program. The senior class selected her as teacher of the year in 2001. She is SAP certified, Apple Teacher Certified, Google Educator Level 1 Certified and is frequently a guest chef at Ronald McDonald House. Dr. Covello lives in Philadelphia with her husband, Paul Marone, a senior investigator for V.E.T.S. and their twin 13 year old daughters, Lucy and Rose.

ONLINE

@cicohen

@margerycovello

Moving Forward by Stepping Back

SESSION OVERVIEW

Influencing others can not only be a daunting task, but sometimes feel impossible in certain cases. How can we have a voice at the table if those around us are not listening? We spend much of our work talking about the students, but at times, forget to consider how do we ensure the other colleagues (whether it be our boss(es), co-teacher(s), etc.) is as effective as we want it to be. In this session, we will examine the parts of our work that are keeping us from having the larger impact and influence we desire and consider some solutions to getting others to buy in more deeply to our goals and ideas.  

HOST BIO

Robert Andruskiewicz has proudly served as a New York City mathematics teacher for more than a decade. He has been a member of Math for America throughout his career, starting his career by being awarded a teaching fellowship and later recognized as a Master Teacher. Robert is a former UFT Chapter Leader, and currently focuses his efforts on creating and sustaining positive learning environments and developing curriculum that is accessible to students of all levels of ability.

Robert Andruskiewicz

LOCATION:

317

A to Zine: Using Zines in Your Classroom

SESSION OVERVIEW

Have you heard of a zine but have no idea what it is or why it exists? Come to A to Zine, a practical, hands-on workshop where participants will be introduced to a variety of zines, learn about their history, and how to facilitate zine-making in the classroom. Participants will create their own one-sheet zine. Teachers are thoughtful creators; they are constantly constructing their curriculum and reflecting on their teaching practice. Despite this, teachers are given few opportunities to reflect and collaborate. In this zine workshop, teachers will have the opportunity to create an 8.5 by 11 zine that is accessible to students of all backgrounds.

HOST BIO

I am the Librarian at Blue School. My project-based learning pedagogy - on topics such as feminism and podcasting - has been featured on EdWeek, WNYC, and the New York Times’ Learning Network.

ONLINE

@lalawinn

Laura Winnick

LOCATION:

242

Low Floor, High Ceiling: Teaching Math for All

SESSION OVERVIEW

In this session, we will explore teacher moves that encourage all students to participate. The goal is to set up questions that all students can discuss (low floor) and then take it as far as the students can go (high ceiling). Participants will get to play with and discuss problems from elementary through the high school level. Math rules! All students deserve the chance to feel excited about mathematics. This session is focused on the ways in which we can structure our classes and discussions toward that end.

HOST BIO

I have been teaching middle and high school math for over 13 years and am still excited about it! I am currently teaching high school in Ithaca, New York.

 

ONLINE

@shaunteaches

Shaun Errichiello

LOCATION:

318

Karoline Kaon

LOCATION:

319

Classroom Economy Empowering Students

SESSION OVERVIEW

Humans need incentives to do things and why not do that with cash-money? (BTW All materials for this system are FREE). If you want to see your students maximize their learning and improve their behavior, classroom economy is a must-have tool. Join our conversation on how emulating society in the classroom can keep students motivated and feel like they control their learning. But like all societies, there are flaws and I am here share my experience but more importantly facilitate a conversation about how we can tailor the system to our own classrooms. This is an opportunity for educators to also engage in a mini “show and tell” about the systems you use in the classroom to incentivize our students. This conversation will have examples from elementary grades but 7 - 12 teachers are encouraged to join us. Bring your ideas, electronic devices, and a smile!


HOST BIO

Karoline is a general education teacher at PSMS 161. With a background in TESOL, most of her teaching experience has been abroad. Karoline went on a Fulbright in Taiwan and hopes to teach in a Chinese dual language classroom. Karoline loves cooking with her husband. She is also a new mom looking forward to cooking with her newborn son, Wylie! 

ONLINE

@mskk41002168

Joe Ferraro

LOCATION:

320

Difficult Conversations:
Facing the Big Questions of Education Head On

SESSION OVERVIEW

The teacher's lounge is the closest place to have the existential questions about teaching, but it isn't the best place. In fact, it might be the very worst place. In this session, experienced and new educators alike will sit kneecap to kneecap to have the conversations we are often too uncomfy to have.

HOST BIO

Joe Ferraro is currently in his 20th year as an educator, teaching English 12, Public Speaking, and Creative Writing. In addition to his work in the classroom, he is the creator and host of the personal growth podcast One Percent Better. His mission is to help people leverage small changes in mindset, language, and behavior in order to get life-changing results. On his quest to learn the secrets of daily improvement, Joe has interviewed some of the most creative minds in the world. Authors like Seth Godin, Daniel Pink, James Clear and Debbie Millman. World Champions like 15-time World Series of Poker champion Phil Hellmuth. People as far reaching as former FBI lead hostage negotiator Chris Voss. Joe's writing has been featured on TopCoach.com and Inside Pitch Magazine. Joe has been a guest on several podcasts, including The Productivityist, Teacher Tunnel, Creative NonFiction, TopCoach, and The Baseball Drive. You can follow Joe and his journey at Onepercentbetterproject.com

ONLINE

@FerraroOnAir

Cultivating Student Racial Equity Leaders

The Coalition On Racial Equity at RepCo HS

SESSION OVERVIEW

Want your students to engage in courageous conversations about race? Want your students lead these conversations and have racial equity permeate their daily existence? Join our CORE (Coalition On Racial Equity) advisor and student representatives in an engaging discussion about the work we have done in our school community and ways to implement this work in yours. Your students are waiting: leave this conversation with more tools to lead students and build capacity in your students to work toward disrupting racism in your school, community and the world.

HOST BIO

Keeshon Morrow is the Assistant Principal and Director of Theatre at the Repertory Company High School for Theatre Arts and the advisory for CORE (Coalition of Racial Equity). Keeshon has been at Repertory since 2011 where he has helped to shape the school culture, academic and artistic excellence for students. He is an experienced teacher and facilitator having worked extensively with the NYC DOE Office of Arts and Special Projects planning and presenting professional development for theatre teachers across this city. Most recently he has worked with the District 2 High School Superintendents team as a member of the Equity Think Tank and ally for the Student Equity Leaders. Keeshon is a proud graduate of the Leaders in Education Apprenticeship Program (LEAP), The City College of NY Program in Educational Theatre and Otterbein University. Jedidah Pacheco is a sophomore in Repertory Company High School and an founding member in CORE (Coalition of Racial Equity). Dorothy Maskara is a sophomore at Repertory Company High School and is an active member of CORE (Coalition Of Racial Equity) and Girl Scouts of Greater New York. Jordan Hampton is a senior at Repertory Company High School for Theater Arts. He is one of the founders of CORE (Coalition Of Racial Equity) at Repertory and is a strong advocate for racial equity and the disruption of racism. Jordan has spoken about CORE to numerous school principals at the District Principals Conference, and students at various other schools at CORE summits. He is very thankful for this opportunity to be able to share one of his many passions with more educators.

Keeshon Morrow, Jedidah Pacheco, Dorothy Maskara

LOCATION:

333

Tiffany Michael, Wanda Hercules, Savina Henry

LOCATION:

335

The Power of Their Questions

SESSION OVERVIEW

During this interactive session, participants will engage in the Question Formulation Technique process which fosters the opportunity for authentic student learning through the inquiry process. If educators are ready to take a leap, this session is sure to push them beyond their zones of comfort by arming them with a greater sense of confidence in their own pedagogical practices. This session is for bold, daring and risk-taking educators who are ready to relinquish the need to control all the learning which takes place within their classroom by using a strategy which is proven to cultivate equity, and excellence through increased student engagement for all learners. .

HOST BIO

Tiffany Michael began her teaching career as a New York City Teaching Fellow 15 years ago. Tiffany has a deep commitment to ensuring that all students have access to quality educational opportunities that equip them for success in the world as lifelong learners. This passion had lead her to her life's calling to support students with diverse learning needs as a Special Educator. Tiffany's journey has afforded her the opportunity to work with children from elementary through High School in both the public school and charter school sectors. During her tenure she has served in numerous leadership capacities. She currently works as a 4th grade ICT and SETSS teacher as well as the Special Education Liaison and new teacher mentor at the George E. Wibecan Prepatory Academy in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. She aspires to continue to grow as an educational leader and is committed to championing the cause of ensuring equity and excellence in all schools and for all children.

 

My name is Wanda Hercules. My Journey with NYCDOE began in February 2014. I am a Special Education Teacher, currently teaching a fifth grade self-contained class. I am also a model teacher, a position I have had for two years. In addition it is my first year as a mentor for new teachers. I am a firm believer that all students can learn despite their individuality. To ensure that each student is given equal opportunities to realize their academic potential, their instruction should include: differentiation to appeal to different modalities and scaffolding. As an educator, I have many goals that I aspire to achieve. In addition to molding the impressionable young minds that are entrusted to me each year, I am committed to developing myself as a leader in education, one who supports: pedagogues, students, and their families.

 

Savina Henry, an IEP and SETSS Teacher at Thaddeus Stevens Elementary School in Bedford Stuyvesant Brooklyn, has been a Special Needs Educator for the past 16 years. Savina, with a passion for teaching and learning as a classroom teacher, grade leader, new teacher mentor and teacher leader has supported students and colleagues in achieving successful academic and professional gains. As an IEP Teacher she has also been afforded the opportunity to support parents during IEP meetings by explaining placement recommendations based on academic, behavioral, and social emotional needs. Savina recently completing her advanced certificate in School Building and District Leader hopes to use her achievements to continue to support students, teachers and parents in fostering equity and excellence for ALL.

THE CONFERENCE

2021

Hudson High School of Learning Technologies

ADDRESS

351 West 18th St

New York, NY 10011

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